Tag Archives: Miso

Miso Soup

Last night I posted the recipe for a yummy miso dressing I made. To go with it, I made a very simple miso soup, which might replace Tom Yum as my go-to soup when I’m sick.

But first, let’s chat about miso for a minute. I’ve been eating miso soup for years — first because it would be given to me free before my sushi arrived. I don’t know if my tastes have changed (well, yes they have changed since I was a meat-eater, obviously, but I’m not sure if that’s the culprit here) or whether I was just not getting the greatest soup, but I used to not be the biggest fan of miso. It has such a mild flavor, I don’t really know what I didn’t like about it. Fortunately, that has changed.

There are many different kinds of miso, but the basics are that it comes from fermented soybeans generally. Though it’s pretty high in sodium (don’t worry — a little goes a long way — only a couple of tablespoons in 4-5 servings of soup), there are many health benefits.

Miso contains protein (about 2 g. per Tablespoon), dietary fiber, omega 3 fatty acids, B12, zinc (great for immune function), copper and manganese.

I still have some investigating to do with the many different types of miso, but I really liked the milk and not-to-salty flavor of the mellow white miso I used in this very basic recipe for miso soup. I imagine I will try many variations of this, including different greens, perhaps some soba noodles and something to spice it up a bit.

Here’s a good start!

Ingredients
• 4 c. water
• 2-4 Tbsp. miso paste
• sliced green parts of one bunch of green onions
• 1 pkg. extra firm tofu, pressed (I used my wonderful TofuXpress — which is PERFECT for something like this — for about 30 minutes before cutting)
• a couple of handfuls of steamed kale

1. Boil 4 c. water and place miso in a separate bowl.

2. Once water is boiling, take a bit of the boiling water and whisk into miso until not lumpy (this is much easier than trying to incorporate it to the whole pot and get lumps out).

3. Remove water from heat and pour miso mixture into it.

4. Slice tofu into very small squares. I ended up using pretty close to an entire package, adding it a few minutes before serving.

5. Add sliced green onions and any greens you might have — I think spinach and watercress  or herbs would be good too. Since I had steamed kale for another dish already, so I grabbed a couple of handfuls of it, chopped it up and tossed it in.

It was smooth and not too salty and I think the combo of tofu-onion-kale was perfect. I can’t wait to mess with it and see what I come up with!

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Miso Dressing

I was throwing together an Asian dinner tonight and had some kale that needed to be used tonight or I would lose it. I decided to grab a tub of miso at the store and whip up some dressing for it. It was delicious. (If I do say so myself!) I’m still learning about all the different types of miso, so I randomly chose mellow white miso. It was great both in the dressing and the soup I made out of it (recipe to come later on that…).

I might thin it out a little next time with some water or a bit more vinegar, but all in all I’d say this was a winner. I think it would work well as a dip for raw veggies or egg rolls too.

In a blender or by hand (which is the option I chose) whisk together the following until smooth.

• 1/4 c. miso paste
• 2 Tbsp. rice vinegar
• 2 Tbsp. sesame oil
• 2 Tbsp. soy sauce  or Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
• 1/2 tsp. fresh minced ginger or 1 tsp. ginger powder
• water as needed to thin out

I steamed a ton of kale (stems removed) using a steamer basket in a large pot for about 10 minutes until it was vibrant green and cooked to my liking. I then drizzled with dressing and sprinkled a bit of black and white sesame seeds on top. I think this would be really good on just about any vegetables — especially the green ones (asparagus, Brussels sprouts, etc.)

Check back tomorrow for the simple miso soup recipe and a bit of info on miso, which is packed with protein, vitamins and minerals!