Tag Archives: miso soup

Miso Vegetable Soup

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As luck would have it, a little spring head cold found its way to me over the weekend. Or maybe it’s allergies. Either way, by Monday morning I was a stuffy, sinus-y mess. I decided a quick miso soup was in order.

When I don’t feel well, whether it’s a cold or a hangover or just feeling blah, my goal is to get as many vegetables into my body as possible. Miso also has many nutritional benefits so it was a no-brainer to throw this together.

FullSizeRender-2In addition to feeling pretty crummy, my 1-year-old, normally a happy baby with an amazing appetite, decided she didn’t want anything I put in front of her. All of which she normally eats up with no hesitation. It all went on the floor and she kept reaching toward the area where I was chopping vegetables and making soup. What should have taken 20 minutes, took close to an hour and by the end of it I threw a little bit of the soup in a bowl to attempt to make her happy. And it did! Obviously, it was a mess, but she loved it. Including the vegetables that were identical to the ones she just finished throwing on the floor. 🙂

I have every intention of feeding her what we eat, but many nights it’s hard to have dinner ready for all of us before she’s ready for dinner, so I often sauté some vegetables and do whatever’s easiest in the moment. Healthy at the end of FullSizeRender-3the day, but not what I’m making for myself. This is a little reminder to try to do that more often so I don’t eventually slip into the bad habit of feeding her only what’s easy or only her favorites.

When we got down the bottom of her bowl, I tipped it up to show her how to drink the rest of the soup. I may regret this later…

This could include just about any veggie you have on hand. Just chop and throw it in the pot together. I was attempting to hurry, so I didn’t even sauté anything first. I was sure to include a couple of cloves of garlic since it’s super good for you when you’re under the weather too. I tossed it in at the end, since raw garlic is more beneficial. Here’s what I did.

Ingredients
• 4 c. low sodium vegetable broth
• 4 c. mushroom broth
•  5 asparagus spears, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
• 1 small zucchini, diced
• 5-6 large baby bella mushrooms, sliced
• 1 large carrot, cut in quarters and thinly sliced
• 3-4 green onions, thinly sliced
• 1 cup leafy kale, washed and chopped, stems removed
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• sea salt and pepper
• 1/2 pkg. of firm tofu, drained in a tofu press and cubed (optional)
• 1/3 c. white miso paste

1. Pour broth into a soup pot and bring to a low rolling boil.
2. Remove 1 c. of the broth to a small bowl and whisk in miso paste. Once dissolved, add back to pot.
3. Chop your veggies whatever size you like and add to pot.
4. Add garlic, salt and pepper to taste.
5. Cook until veggies are of desired doneness.
6. Add cubed tofu if using and continue to simmer until heated through.
7. Chow down!

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Miso Soup

Last night I posted the recipe for a yummy miso dressing I made. To go with it, I made a very simple miso soup, which might replace Tom Yum as my go-to soup when I’m sick.

But first, let’s chat about miso for a minute. I’ve been eating miso soup for years — first because it would be given to me free before my sushi arrived. I don’t know if my tastes have changed (well, yes they have changed since I was a meat-eater, obviously, but I’m not sure if that’s the culprit here) or whether I was just not getting the greatest soup, but I used to not be the biggest fan of miso. It has such a mild flavor, I don’t really know what I didn’t like about it. Fortunately, that has changed.

There are many different kinds of miso, but the basics are that it comes from fermented soybeans generally. Though it’s pretty high in sodium (don’t worry — a little goes a long way — only a couple of tablespoons in 4-5 servings of soup), there are many health benefits.

Miso contains protein (about 2 g. per Tablespoon), dietary fiber, omega 3 fatty acids, B12, zinc (great for immune function), copper and manganese.

I still have some investigating to do with the many different types of miso, but I really liked the milk and not-to-salty flavor of the mellow white miso I used in this very basic recipe for miso soup. I imagine I will try many variations of this, including different greens, perhaps some soba noodles and something to spice it up a bit.

Here’s a good start!

Ingredients
• 4 c. water
• 2-4 Tbsp. miso paste
• sliced green parts of one bunch of green onions
• 1 pkg. extra firm tofu, pressed (I used my wonderful TofuXpress — which is PERFECT for something like this — for about 30 minutes before cutting)
• a couple of handfuls of steamed kale

1. Boil 4 c. water and place miso in a separate bowl.

2. Once water is boiling, take a bit of the boiling water and whisk into miso until not lumpy (this is much easier than trying to incorporate it to the whole pot and get lumps out).

3. Remove water from heat and pour miso mixture into it.

4. Slice tofu into very small squares. I ended up using pretty close to an entire package, adding it a few minutes before serving.

5. Add sliced green onions and any greens you might have — I think spinach and watercress  or herbs would be good too. Since I had steamed kale for another dish already, so I grabbed a couple of handfuls of it, chopped it up and tossed it in.

It was smooth and not too salty and I think the combo of tofu-onion-kale was perfect. I can’t wait to mess with it and see what I come up with!